Teen Dependence Syndrome

The great thing about having a larger-than-average family is that you are never lonely.  Also?  The bad thing about having a larger-than-average family is that you are never lonely.  I just sent everyone (including Larry) to the pool, because if I don't get 2 seconds of privacy/quiet around here, I will go stark raving mad.

Only, I just realized that a teenager managed to stay behind by hiding in my basement.  Luckily, he doesn't seem inclined to talk to me much, anyway.  And it happens to be David, so maybe I can get him to fix a few of the things that went wrong while he selfishly went away for a week to learn how to fly gliders. 

Larry and I, vis-a-vis technology
It's sad, really - Larry brings him home from the airport last night and the kid has barely put down his bag before we're all "Oh, hey, can you get the desktop computer to stop making this loud buzzing sound so we can watch all these YouTube videos that have been piling up all week?" and "The clock on the kitchen radio keeps blinking 12:00 at us and we can't fix it" and "The printer's been doing this weird thing..."

I don't know if I want to be able to see what we look like through David's eyes.  Also, I don't know what we'll do if he decides to skip out to college early, taking all his crazy computer skills with him, the way Theo did with his mad cooking talents 4 years ago.  I haven't had a decent stir fry since, I'll have you know.  I guess that, once David leaves, Larry and I will be doomed to a life of blinking clocks and unintelligible flash mob videos, is all. 






Hey, it's always 12:00 somewhere, right?



[Confused sign image: California PsychCare]
[Clock image: Grey Ghost]

Comments

  1. I rely on my son for lots of heavy lifting and replacing light bulbs and other tasks that require height. I don't know what I will do when he goes to college.

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    1. I know! The height-helpfulness aspect of teen boys goes without saying around here, as I am less than 5 feet tall. Once all the boys leave, I'm just going to have to invest in a folding step stool for each floor of the house.

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  2. My 10yo is already the verified bug person. He rescues spiders and takes them outside, sprays wasps that try to build nests by the front door, identifies other bugs that invade my house... I don't want to give him up EVER.

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    1. Brian's my bug guy, but he refuses to do spiders. Also, I pay him a quarter a bug.

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  3. You need to go about this differently. Have David train one of the younger ones how to fix these things for you so you'll have someone in house for awhile lol

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  4. You can learn the clock thing! The computer stuff is always changing and you'll likely never be able to keep up with it, but have him teach you how to stop the blinky clock! Take notes like it's a class. You can do it.

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  5. I can usually fix stuff, but need to teach me boys how to fix things also. They are learning how to patch drywall this summer. They are the ones who put the holes in their walls, they should fix them. I need to teach them how to do the joint compound properly, then one we are done, they can wash down all their walls and ceiling, prime the patches and new joint compound and paint their room. They have the largest bedroom, which was the girls room the last time we painted it. For some reason, the boys have expressed a desire for a non pepto bismol pink room.

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  6. Twice a day you'll be right on time!
    Ah, isn't it great how we can need our kids?

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  7. I've been known to just not watch a movie until someone comes home to do the BlueRay player for me. Too many remotes.

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  8. My older teen is the same kind of helper here, plus today he hung a load of laundry on the line AND vacuumed the entire house. Granted, he was avoiding homework, but it was still pretty darn wonderful.

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