Going Batty

The bug guys come tomorrow to tell me if we still have bats.  I know, you all wish you were me.  In the meantime, our little Susie has developed night terrors and a sleepwalking habit. She will be awake and acting freaked out and crying out in fear and she doesn't recognize us.

Remember that scene in It's A Wonderful Life where George Bailey is in Nick's bar and he sees old Mr. Gower come in, panhandling, and he shakes him by the shoulders and says, "Mr. Gower! Mr. Gower! Don't you recognize me?" And Mr. Gower stares at him and says, "No! No!" in a freaked-out sort of way?

That is precisely what is happening here. And then Larry and I argue (every single time) over whether we should coax her to sleep or wake her up thoroughly to stop whatever is going on. But it doesn't really matter, because we can't rouse her and we can't get her right back to sleep and I lie in bed deciding that she has contracted rabies from an unnoticed bat bite and she is going to die.

We don't know what to do about this. Brian sleepwalks from time to time, but he is very cheerful about it and is easy to lead back to bed. Of course, there was that noteworthy incident last May when Larry and I, woken up by someone knocking on our motel room door in Georgia, realized that Brian had wandered outside in his sleep while we snoozed. I think that was the night before Rachel had croup and a raging fever that made her throw up at 2 AM.  

Vacations never seem to be very restful for us.

Anyhow, any sleepwalking/night terrors advice out there? I mean, other than barricading the front and back doors at night - we've pretty much got that part down.

Comments

  1. I'm so sorry about the bats and the night terrors. Call your pediatrician to ask her advice. Just remember, this will pass.

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  2. Is she on any meds? My younger daughter started doing some weird stuff when she was on an allergy med (that she is no longer on).

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  3. No advice, just sympathy. Sounds scary. Hope it passes soon.

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  4. My 12 year old son has night terrors periodically. I have found that if I talk in a soothing voice about something he likes (a favorite hobby or friend) then he calms down faster. I hope this helps.

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  5. Oh my This is so scary. When this would happen w/ Jack we would just hold him and talk to him. Much freakier for the grownups than the kids b/c they don't remember the terror but we do.

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  6. UGH. Night terrors are awful. I have no advice, only sympathy for you.

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  7. My son has had night terrors sporadically since he was 5 months old. He only does it when he's having massive growth spurts (physical or mental) and/or is on meds that aren't the right fit and/or is extremely overtired. Melatonin before bed can help. When they do happen, talking to her calmly and just trying to get her back in bed is probably your best bet. Hang in there. They usually only happen for a week or two at a time... at least, that's the case here.

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  8. My oldest had sleepwaking/night terrors and just speaking softly and gently guiding him back to bed helped. We couldn't have a conversation with him or try to wake him (made it worse). In his case it was a combination of allergy meds and just who he is (after taking him off those meds he still did it once in a while, but not as often). We put a jingle bell on the front door so that we'd hear it if he opened it.

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  9. I don't envy you the night terrors. When kids would be inconsolable in the middle of the night, I would softly sing "Jesus Loves Me" over and over and over again, because it was the only thing that would calm the child. Of course, it was a familiar song to the child... I don't know if it would work otherwise!
    My only advice about sleepwalkers is to make sure they don't think that a kitchen cupboard or hall closet or siblings room is a toilet... Experience? Why, yes!

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  10. Oh how crazy! Strap her to the bed maybe? Kidding of course ;)

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